Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘New Mexico’ Category

Canyon Road Winter Twilight
Do not say you will come back
When it is warmer
When you have time
When the light is better
When the galleries are open
When the chestnut trees are green
When a woman in red sits on the garden bench
When the blue gate is wide open
When the duende seizes you
When you are not obsessing
When you are not regretting
When you are not counting
Your losses
See the Hunger Moon scale the Sangres
Press the shutter. Now.
Sharon Niederman, February, 2012

Canyon Road, Santa Fe

Read Full Post »

Here is the information regarding Irma’s gathering/celebration in ABQ, NM.
Please post in all locations, methods, as you see fit to spread the word.
>Time:
Friday 9 March 2012, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.

>Place:
Susan Ford Bales Room; (Gerald & Betty Ford Library Building) ; BOSQUE SCHOOL,
Albuquerque, New Mexico
>Learning Road off Coors Boulevard on the west side of the Rio Grande in the bosque<
It is a lovely nature based location, easy to find, with parking and ease of accessibility.
The scheduled day is at the end of a school break week making it ideal.

FRIENDS OF ELMER are organizing comfort foods reflecting what Irma often served to “all her children” (beans, corn bread, Santa Domingo tamales, ham, cole slaw, cucumbers and onions in vinegar, “Green Fluffy” etc. (Those wanting to assist with food, supplies, are invited to call John @ 505-615-5090).
Please join in this celebration by bringing something Irma-related to share as a basis for personal story about Irma, her indomitable spirit, her rich long life.
Irma finally has all the elbow room she needs for offering the blessings of her connecting love and compassion.
SPREAD THE WORD
RSVP: flaminggourmet@yahoo.com
Questions: 505-615-5090

Read Full Post »

From the introduction to SIGNS & SHRINES: SPIRITUAL JOURNEYS ACROSS NEW MEXICO

Due out from the Countryman Press March 5, 2012

. . .Why do certain natural settings of mountains, groves, streams, and rocks, and certain cultural properties and built landscapes, such as shrines, churches, temples, and monuments, evoke feelings of awe, wholeness, and belonging to a sphere much larger than our everyday reality?

At sites such as Bandelier National Monument, Chaco Canyon, and Taos Mountain, at the Earth Journey stupa in El Rito, the Temple Montefiore cemetery in Las Vegas, and the Marigold Day of the Dead Parade in Albuquerque, or walking the grounds of the Upaya Zen Center in Santa Fe, or watching the Mescalero Apaches’ ceremonial Dance of the Mountain Gods, peace, connection, a sense of being blessed, of purpose, of participating in a drama beyond our own, temporarily overwhelms our petty “monkey mind” without our conjuring it or trying for it.

It matters not what our individual religious beliefs are. Such places speak to us in their own subtle, strong, and silent language if we are the least bit open. All I can say is: Welcome to New Mexico!. . .

What struck me so forcefully, from the time I first traveled through New Mexico in 1972, is the peaceful coexistence of so many different, clearly articulated spiritual paths. An early drive through the Jemez amazed me with the sight, in close proximity, in this narrow canyon, of Buddhist, Catholic, and Native American communities.  . .

This book highlights special places in New Mexico where we may retreat to repair our souls, rest from the world, seek peace in a community where the dedicated, such as the Benedictine monks at Christ in the Desert Monastery, devote their lives to offering just such a possibility to guests. One may join in the practice of prayers or meditation, or simply sit by the flowing river in silence and watch the changing light on the rock walls of the canyon. . .

Read Full Post »

Life is Like a One Night Stand

I want to put my arms around Life

Hold it close, squeeze it tight

Climb on it

Wrap my legs around it

Twist with it

Explode with it

I want to dance with life

Though it pushes me around the floor

Too close to the edge

Keeps me in the dark

Does not say “Thank you”

Expects to take me home

Life is not a good person

And does not care what I think

About that

Life is a narcissist

With no intention of changing

Of course he has others

But we don’t talk about that

Life is a crude lover

He doesn’t “get” me

Or pay attention

Or take time

Life does not give me what I want most

Life only gives me what he feels like giving

When he is in the mood

But, hey, Life, I know you need me

To look you in the eye, to tell your stories

We meet up at the hot springs

In Truth or Consequences

Moonrise over Turtleback Mountain

Lights the Rio Grande silver

Life takes me to his beached Airstream

Has his way with me all night long.

@ Sharon Niederman, Jan. 2, 2012

My new year commitment: I will be blogging at least every Monday. . .appreciate your visits & comments.

Read Full Post »

“You Can Set Your Calendar by the Curlews”

Spring is in full swing on the three-generation Copeland and Sons Hereford Ranch 18 miles north of Nara Visa in Union County, New Mexico. “The curlews always nest here. You can set your calendar by their  arrival on April 1,” says Cliff Copeland, President of the New Mexico Beef Council. The gramma and buffalo grasses are still mostly brown, but a little rain will bring the green shoots close to the ground right up, Cliff says.  “We can hear the migratory birds now, the Canada geese and sandhill cranes flying north, and the mallard ducks that nest here are arriving.”
But the best signs of spring are the healthy baby calves now arriving. Calving season from Feb.-April is one of Cliff’s favorite times of year, along with the branding season that follows. That’s  when the Copelands  and nearby ranchers “neighbor up”  the old-fashioned way to help each other get the chore done while they visit and catch up.
Part of the Copelands’ daily ritual is a morning  family visit, often by phone, between Cliff and his photographer wife Pat;  son Matt and his wife Kyra; and Cliff’s parents, Cliff Sr. and Barbara, to prioritize and divide up the responsibilities that need tending that day. “Day off is not even in our vocabulary,” Cliff observes. “This is a hard and healthy lifestyle. My Dad is 79 and he still puts in a full day’s work. He is still active in every part of the ranch.”
Cliff grew up on the ranch and never thought about being anything other than a rancher. He left home to study Animal Science at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces and returned with a knowledge of genetics. He is able to see the genetic selection process, the results of their choices, every year with the arrival of the baby calves.
“The weather has been cooperative,” he says of this year’s calving season. “It’s too dry now. We could use some rain, and that may be coming soon”

Cliff Copeland

Read Full Post »

Signs & Shrines: Spiritual Journeys Across New Mexico
Text and Photos by Sharon Niederman – Forthcoming from The Countryman Press, 2012

SIGNS & SHRINES: SPIRITUAL JOURNEYS ACROSS NEW MEXICO takes the reader along  the ancient pilgrimage trails that crisscross this enchanted state where a rich multiplicity of cultures continues to thrive. The mysteries of sacred sites, natural wonders, power spots, feast days and festivals are explained by one of the state’s most prolific and knowledgable authors, and the book is illustrated with soulful images from her travels.  In addition to providing  cultural context that answers visitors’ questions about the history and practices found only in New Mexico, the author provides clear directions, maps and guidance on the best places to stay, dine, shop and recreate. SIGNS & SHRINES  is an innovative guide that will enrich the experience not only of spiritual seekers but of every visitor drawn to experience the marvelous Land of Enchantment.

Read Full Post »

New Mexico One Taste at a Time
By Pat Veltri, Sharon Niederman photos

Reprinted by permission of the Raton Range
Story appeared Tues., Jan. 25, 2011
It’s been said by a daily customer at Yum-Yum’s, a “mom and pop” restaurant, in Tularosa, that the brisket served there is so tender she has to take her teeth out to eat it! This is one example of the many culinary anecdotes, experiences, and traditions gathered throughout New Mexico by author, journalist, and photographer Sharon Niederman  while organizing and writing her latest book, New Mexico’s Tasty Traditions: recollections, recipes and photos.

Niederman’s tenth book is comprised of sixteen essays, each illustrated with colorful photos and each focusing on food legacies, histories, traditions, and recipes representative of New Mexico. New Mexico’s Tasty Traditions treats the reader to “an armchair tour of cafes, ranches, festivals, home kitchens and farmers markets through the eyes of a veteran food-travel writer” according to the back cover of the book. The book concludes with a special section providing readers with a ready-made schedule outlining the state’s fairs, festivals, and other food events for the coming year.  (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.